Spotting Turfgrass Diseases and How to Treat Them

BJ Haunert - Thursday, August 18, 2016

live grass next to dead grass

With an array of turfgrass diseases seemingly stalking your yard for the purposes of killing off your foliage, it can easily become overwhelming to stay on top of the issue, and disconcerting when the various fungi win the battle. The key to overcoming turfgrass disaster is not only recognizing the impending signs and treating them accordingly, but by understanding the root issues that cause their arrival in the first place. Proper mowing, watering, fertilizing, and pest management all play their own role in keeping turfgrass diseases at bay.

Brown Patch

The scourge of all commonly cultivated cool-season turfgrass, Brown Patch susceptibility begins with grass selection. Common hosts include perennial rye, Kentucky bluegrass, and tall fescue, so act accordingly should you select these grasses. Look for the following signals that indicate that Brown Patch has reared its ugly head in your yard:

• Circular patches of dead and dying grasses
• Exhibits frog-eye symptoms
• Brown-patch spots on individual blades

Unfortunately, restorative and curative efforts frequently fail, so you should begin fungicide efforts immediately and monitor your patch of green diligently for signs of spreading disease. Preventive measures, before the fact, are the way to go in stopping the appearance of Brown Patch in the first place.


Nitrogen, that catnip for lawn grass, stimulates a lush green growth that is regrettably more susceptible to brown patch's malevolent appearance. As such, avoid the urge to pile on the nitrogen applications during the summer months, and avoid an irrigation schedule that will keep your turf wet for longer than six hours at a time. To ensure that your blades are dry by nightfall, you should put on the sprinklers early in the morning.


For help with any kind of threat to your lawn, contact Modern Turf today!

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